My cat and the Scenar





 

 

To whom it may concern,

I enclose three photographs of my silver Maine Coon cat, Argie.  He became very ill aged 2 years, following several vaccinations.  He developed pneumonia and pleurisy and eventually was admitted to Leahurst Veterinary Hospital, Liverpool.  He was diagnosed with severe bronchial asthma following CT scans and biopsies, at a cost of £2000.  I was given an inhaler to use twice a day and he remained well for 4 years. A year ago he became ill again, coughing and sneezing persistently and looking miserable, with a lank, greasy coat.  It was extremely cold here and I assumed it was the weather causing the problem.  When summer came, showing no signs of improvement, he was seeing the vet for two antibiotic injections every 3 weeks and becoming progressively more ill.
 

 

 

Vivienne suggested I should try treating him with the Scenar, but that I would have to wet his coat before using it.  Following her advice, I proceeded to treat him every evening. 

I wet the coat starting with the top of his head and down his spine and used the Scenar on these areas, often having to keep wetting them during the treatment. 


Sometimes it would take 15 minutes to treat some areas.  I also treated both sides of his neck, under his chin and his chest. 

After a while, I began to notice some improvement; his coughing and sneezing became less, his coat improved in appearance and he became playful and lively again.
 

 



I began doing this at the end of July 2011 and I have not seen a vet since.  Therefore he has received no antibiotics, which is good.  I now only treat him every other day and will soon go on to reduce this to every 3 days as he is doing so well.  He has not coughed or sneezed at all for the past 2 days, his eyes are big and bright and his coat is looking healthy.  It is remarkable, as I was worried he would be readmitted to the hospital earlier in the year.  I have nothing but praise for the Scenar machine and I do wonder if my lovely cat would still be alive without it.

 

Regards,

Joan Smethurst.